Short History of Spices
and Spice Trade
Kurze Geschichte der Gewürze
und des Gewürzhandels

Desire, fashion and taste move empires.

-Paul Freedman, Out Of The East

Spices and herbs are not an invention of mankind. Rather, they grow on Earth long before Adam and Eve. Man learns to use them and take advantage of them. Spices critically influence the course of world history and the development of seafaring, shipbuilding and geography. A history of eating and healing, money and influence, murder and manslaughter.

Archaeological finds confirm the use of spices such as caraway and herbs like dill for North Africa and Europe already in the Stone Age. In ancient times, herbs are used as burial and in tinctures for embalming the dead.

As early as in the first millennium BC, there is maritime spice trade between India, Arabia, Persia and East Africa on offshore sea routes in the Indian Ocean, the Gulf of Persia and the Red Sea. Spices such as pepper, cardamom and ginger coming up the Nile to the young Alexandria thus reach the Roman Empire.

The Romans stock Oriental goods such as spices in so-called Horrea piperataria – pepper warehouses. In the first centuries AD they are practicing pepper tolls – taxes paid in the form of pepper or spices – along the trade routes within their empire. Later they will pay the Goths with pepper ransoms to free from their sieges.

Already around 50 AD the Greek Dioskurides in detail describes turmeric originating from India in his Materia Medica.

Charles the Great around 800 has dozens of native plants put on a list of useful herbs and organize their sustainable cultivation. Hildegard von Bingen, the Palatine abbess, at the beginning of the 12th century describes the healing effects of native plants such as lavender in the treatment of diseases.

It is plausible that the narratives on Sindbad the Sailor who presumingly in the 11th or 12th century reaches the East Indies from Basra are connected with the early maritime spice trade.

From the 12th century onwards, the Crusades which gave Christian Europe access to the Middle Eastern trade areas initiate a sort of original spice boom in Europe. Venice and Genoa monopolize the spice trade between the Mediterranean ports and Europe. North of the Alps, Nuremberg and Augsburg (Fuggers) become important trading centers. Transit stations in the Middle East are located at the endpoints of the Silk Route – Constantinople and Levante ports as well as of the caravan routes of the traders from the south of the Arabian Peninsula – Alexandria.

Around 1393, one pound of nutmeg in Germany reportedly costs as much as seven fat oxen. Spices soar up to the rank of a currency. Goods prices are stated in pepper grains and municipalities set their budgets in physical pepper. Spices are worth gold and allow the intermediaries to calculate mark-ups of hundreds of percents. According to different sources, on their journey from the origins in the East Indies to the user in Europe spices go through up to twelve trade levels and increase in price by 30 times. Such profit margins are not achieved today even in drug trafficking.

Ginger ale and mulled wine are probably the remnants of a medieval chic fashion, according to which all food and drink have to be exotically flavored over-the-top – probably also for the sake of social prestige. At any rate, literary sources show that at that time spice consumption in Europe is many times higher than it is today.

Maldivian Baggala (Dhow)

Xavier Romero-Frias, Painting of a Maldivian baggala. Acrylic on canvas. 2009

Until the beginning of the 16th century, when the Portuguese by sea reach the Malabar coast, then the East Indies and finally the Moluccas, the spice trade with the East Indies and the Far East was largely monopolized by the Arabs. On the one hand, they control large parts of the ground route along the Silk Road, where they collect natural tolls. On the other hand, they sail the seas with their Dhows under the monsoon and bring cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and pepper of India and the spice port of Malacca on the Malay Peninsula to Zanzibar, Aden and Oman from where camel caravans take them through the deserts of Arabia thru Jiddah and Suez to the shores of the Mediterranean. From here take over the Venetians and Genoese who with their part of the trade monopoly lead their city states to the highest economic prosperity.

When 1453 Constantinople falls to the Turks and the Christian Byzantine Empire breaks, the rules of spice-transit through the Middle East suffer changes. From now on, the Ottoman Sultan provides for steadily rising duties on Oriental luxury goods, including spices. This drives the spice prices in Europe from one all-time high to the other and makes it worthwhile for the European maritime powers of Spain and Portugal to search for alternative, independent spice routes across the sea. In 1494, in the Treaty of Tordesillas, both rulers agree in principle to divide the world in such a way that Spain explores the western hemisphere and Portugal the eastern hemisphere.

Spices as a global commodity now have a world economic importance equal to that of oil and natural gas in the 20th century. Columbus’ expeditions from 1492 onwards are financed by the Spanish crown to find the sea route to India, to the origins of spice. The surprising discovery of America is a historically significant side effect, but not the purpose of these expeditions.

However, the yield of spices on the Spanish side of the world is rather modest. Columbus and later Cortes bring at least previously unknown chili, vanilla and allspice from Central America to Europe. But not more than these. Vasco da Gama and Alfonso de Albuquerque on the Portuguese side do way better with their discoveries in India, Ceylon, Java, the Moluccas and on the South China coast: besides demanded pepper, ginger and cardamom from the Indian subcontinent or Canehl (cinnamon) from Ceylon, it is mainly nutmeg and cloves from the East-Indian Moluccas which ultimately drive Portugal’s rise to colonial power in the 16th century.

As the Moluccas are unknown in Europe in 1494 they are not mentioned in the Tordesillas Treaty. While Portugal successfully spins their spice monopoly, Spain also sees its potential. The alternative to the Portuguese-controlled spice route around the Cape of Good Hope could be in the western sea route that Christopher Columbus had been previously seeking for. Ironically, it is the Portuguese Ferdinand Magellan to whom the Spanish crown entrusts a fleet which is now to find this sea route. In fact, he reaches the Philippines in 1521 where he is killed in a battle with natives. Until then, he discovers the named after him passage in South America and the Pacific ocean. It is his petty officer Elcano, now captain of the Victoria, who in 1522 reaches the Moluccas and by the end of the year with a shipload of spices returns to Spanish ground. The first circumnavigation of the globe is completed and the spherical shape of Earth is practically proven. In the East Indian spice trade, however, Spain will never have a substantial role.

In the middle of the century, the Arabian spice monopoly is broken and replaced by the Portuguese one that has no need for camel caravans over the silk road or the Arabian peninsula. Portugal now controls spice cultivation and trade from Goa and Kalikut (India) to Banda Neira and Ternate (Moluccas). The new spice route runs across the Indian Ocean, around the African continent to the north to Lisbon, Amsterdam and Hamburg. Venice and Genoa lose their privileged position following a loss of importance of the Levant trade and enter a phase of economic decline. Wars for control of the spice trade are now between European powers.

By the end of the 16th century (after 1580), Portugal due to the absence of a successor to the throne falls into the personal union with Spain and therefore also in conflict with its enemies, especially the emerging maritime power Netherlands. At the beginning of the 17th century, almost all Portuguese possessions from Brazil over Africa to the East Indies come into the hands of the Dutch for many decades. Portuguese India breaks and the global spice trade goes to the Dutch. With their United East India Company they create an early capitalist instrument for the systematic exploitation of the spice origins. They massacre and enslave the locals, impose illegal spice cultivation and trade under punishment and scarce production and supply by destroying whole harvests and fire burns as on Tidore and Ternate.

Until the 18 th century global spices trade is characterized by monopolies. While for the Arabs it is enough to conceal their sources of reference, or to tell absurd and scary stories that present the search for them as risky and hopeless, Portuguese and Dutch, on the other hand, are carrying out bloody wars about origins and trade routes. Early 17th century also engulfs England, which erects its first colony on the small Moluccan Islands of Rhun and Ai. After all, the bloody sieges of the Netherlanders force the English to leave Rhun and in 1667 in the Peace of Breda they swap it for New Amsterdam, today’s New York.

These monopolies are first concealed in secret by the French who in the 18th century succeed to annex dreamy tropical islands such as Ile Bourbon and Mauritius though, but hardly find any useful flora on them. So, Pierre Poivre, governor of the French overseas territories, in 1769 has seeds and seedlings of cloves and nutmeg trees smuggle from the Dutch Moluccas and bring them to Mauritius for domestication and systematic farming. His success anyway is limited, at least on Mauritius.

At the time of British rule in the Indian Ocean, around 1810 cloves and nutmeg come from the Ile Bourbon, which was renamed La Reunion, to Zanzibar, where the Sultan of Oman is still governing and declaring their cultivation a national task. Until the second half of the 20th century Zanzibar is holding a new cloves monopoly with 90 percent of the world’s trade volume which collapses 1980 with the market entry of Indonesia and the subsequent dramatic price decline.

The British bring nutmeg later also to the Caribbean where to this day the small Grenada is world market leader in nutmeg and mace. However, due to global diversification of origins and comparatively moderate demand this small monopoly doesn’t have a role like in the days of the Portuguese and the Dutch.

Another natural monopoly is bypassed by the French the technological way. It is about vanilla native in Mexico and controlled by Spain which is now in demand in Europe, but almost unaffordable. Meantime it grows and flourishes also on Ile Bourbon, but does not produce any fruit. Only the Melipona bee which occurs exclusively in Mexico can pollinate vanilla flowers and thus trigger the growth of vanilla pods. This changes when, in 1841, the slave Edmond Albius succeeds for the first time in La Réunion to artificially produce a pollination of vanilla blossoms with the aid of a cactus tangle under natural conditions. Thus, the Bourbon vanilla is born and the Mexican monopoly is broken.

Today pepper mostly originates from Vietnam or Brazil, less from India, nutmeg most likely from Grenada and vanilla from Madagascar. Global production makes spices lose their erstwhile mysticism and exoticism of remote, unknown countries and makes them highly available everyday products. With the beginning of industrialization, they lose the luxurious. A marker of social status turns into a cooking ingredient. Manhattan is a prosperous hotspot of the global financial industry, the Banda Island Rhun, which it was once exchanged for, a poor island under palm trees. From 1869 onwards, the new Suez Canal has barely given impulses for spice trades beyond transit times and freight rates, but for the new industries of Europe and for a new status symbol: Travel to remote, unknown countries.

Source of images

Unless stated otherwise, all images used on this page are Public Domain published on Wikipedia (wikipedia.org).

Periodics® Spice Timeline

1180

The Spice Shop

Under Henry II in London the first spice board in history, the Guild of Pepperers, is founded.

 

In London lässt Heinrich II. den ersten Gewürzfachverband der Geschichte, die Guild of Pepperers, gründen.

1300

Marco Polo Die Wunder der Welt

Rustichello’s book “Devisement du Monde” on Marco Polo’s adventures in the Orient pushes demand on spices in Europe.

 

Rustichellos Buch “Die Wunder der Welt” über Marco Polos Erlebnisse im Orient schürt die Nachfrage nach Gewürzen in Europa.

1453

Einnahme Konstantinopels 1453

The fall of Constantinople and the rise of the Osman Empire bring ground routes of spice trades under muslim control.

 

Mit dem Fall Konstantinopels und dem Aufstieg des Osmanischen Reiches geraten die Landrouten des Gewürzhandels unter muslimische Kontrolle.

1494

Treaty of Tordesillas

Spain and Portugal sign the Tordesillas Treaty and divide the world between each other setting a demarcation line in the Atlantic at 46 degrees west.

 

Im Vertrag von Tordesillas teilen Spanien und Portugal die Welt untereinander auf, indem bei 46 Grad West eine Demarkationslinie im Atlantik festgelegt wird.

1496

The Four Voyages of Columbus 1492-1503

Christopher Columbus brings chili seeds to Spain from his second expedition.

 

Christoph Kolumbus bringt von seiner zweiten Entdeckungsfahrt Chili-Samen mit nach Spanien.

1498

Vasco da Gama

Portuguese Vasco da Gama is the first European to reach Indian Malabar coast over the sea route sailing around the Cape of Good Hope.

 

Der Portugiese Vasco da Gama erreicht als erster Europäer auf dem Seeweg um das Kap der Guten Hoffnung die Malabarküste in Indien.

1510

Goa map Stadtplan 1750

The conquest of Goa by Alfonso de Albuquerque gives birth to Portuguese-India.

 

Die Einnahme Goas durch Alfonso de Albuquerque begründet Portugiesisch-Indien.

1511

Malacca Malakka 1726

Alfonso de Albuquerque conquests the trade and port city of Malacca on the Malayan Peninsula. It remains Portuguese until conquest by the Dutch 1641.

 

Alfonso de Albuquerque erobert die Handels- und Hafenstadt Malakka auf der malayischen Halbinsel. Sie bleibt portugiesisch bis zur Eroberung durch die Niederländer 1641.

1512

Moluccas Molukken 1760

The Portuguese erect first bases on the Moluccas and build their spice monopoly on cloves and nutmeg.

 

Die Portugiesen errichten erste Stützpunkte auf den Molukken und begründen ihr Gewürzmonopol auf Nelken und Muskatnuss.

1519

Hernán Cortés

Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés is served vanilla-sweetened xololatl by Aztec king Montezuma II and thus gets attentive to the spice.

 

Der spanische Conquistador Hernán Cortés wird von Aztekenkönig Moctezuma II. mit vanillegesüßtem Xocolatl bewirtet und wird so auf das Gewürz aufmerksam.

1526

1526-Suleiman_the_Magnificent_and_the_Battle_of_Mohacs-Hunername-large

With their victory in the battle of Mohács the Osmans occupy Hungary and bring paprika into the country.

 

Die Osmanen siegen in der Schlacht von Mohács, besetzen Ungarn und bringen den Paprika ins Land.

1578

Compendium of Materia Medica Pen-tsao Kang-mu 1593

Li Shizhen completes the original version of his Great Herbal Pen-tsao Kang-mu.

 

Li Shizhen vollendet die Urfassung seines Kräuterkompendiums Pen-tsao Kang-mu.

1600

Venice Venedig 1650

Venice and Genoa lose their monopoly on spice trade in the Mediterranean.

 

Venedig und Genua verlieren das Gewürzhandelsmonopol im Mittelmeer.

1602

VOC Share Aktie 1606

Founding of Dutch United East-Indies Company (VOC), world’s first joint stock company.

 

Gründung der niederländischen Vereinigten Ostindien Companie (VOC), der ersten Aktiengesellschaft der Welt.

1605

Ternate Molucca Molukken

The victory over the Spaniards on Tidore and the erection of Fort Oranje by the VOC 1607 on Ternate mark the beginning of Dutch dominance over the spice islands.

 

Mit dem Sieg über die Spanier auf Tidore und der Errichtung von Fort Oranje durch die VOC auf Ternate 1607 beginnt die niederländische Herrschaft auf den Gewürzinseln.

1619

Batavia 1681

The Dutch burn down Jayakarta on Java and found Batavia as South-East Asian HQ for the VOC and hub of their East-Indies trades.

 

Die Niederländer brennen Jayakarta auf Java nieder und gründen Batavia als Südostasiensitz der VOC und Zentrum ihres Ostindienhandels.

1621

VOC Map Karte 1680-1735

The Dutch succeed in complete expulsion of the Portuguese and the Spaniards from the Moluccas.

 

Den Niederländern gelingt die vollständige Vertreibung der Portugiesen und Spanier von den Molukken.

1663

Cannonore Fort & Bay 1800

The loss of all Malabar dominions to the Dutch leads into the break-down of Portuguese-India.

 

Der Verlust sämtlicher Malabar-Besitzungen an die Niederländer führt zum Niedergang Portugiesisch-Indiens.

1681

Amboyna Fort 1655

Three fourths of all clove and nutmeg trees on the Moluccas are destroyed to keep supply down and prices up.

 

Drei Viertel aller Nelken- und Mukatnussbäume auf den Molukken sind vernichtet, um das Angebot knapp und die Preise hoch zu halten.

1769

Pierre Poivre (1719-1786)

Pierre Poivre “kidnappes” cloves tree seedling (Syzygium aromaticum) from Dutch-colonized Moluccas and domesticates them on Mauritius and La Réunion.

 

Pierre Poivre “entführt” Setzlinge des Nelkenbaumes Syzygium aromaticum von den holländisch kolonisierten Molukken und siedelt sie auf Mauritius und Bourbon an.

1841

Edmond Albius

The slave Edmond Albius succeeds for the first time in artificial pollination of vanilla blossoms on La Réunion (former Ile Bourbon).

 

Dem Sklaven Edmond Albius gelingt erstmalig die künstliche Befruchtung von Vanilleblüten auf La Réunion (ehem. Ile Bourbon).

1858

Louis Pasteur

French doctor Louis Pasteur discovers antibiotic effect of garlic.

 

Der französische Arzt Louis Pasteur entdeckt die antibiotische Wirkung von Knoblauch.

1869

Suez Canal 1882

Opening of the Suez Canal.

 

Eröffnung des Suez-Kanals.

1870

Piper nigrum pepper plant Pfefferpflanze

In the Malaysian province of Sarawak on Borneo systematic pepper farming begins.

 

In der malayischen Provinz Sarawak auf Borneo beginnt der systematische Pfefferanbau.

1883

Sorry, no image yet.

The Dutch domesticate Ceylon cinnamon on Java. Karawang (west of Java) becomes the main origin for Cinnamomum burmanni.

 

Die Niederländer machen Ceylon-Zimt auf Java heimisch, Karawang (West-Java) wird zum Hauptanbaugebiet von Cinnamomum burmanni.

1912

Wilbur Scoville

American pharmacist Wilbur Scoville invents named after him organoleptic test for determination of heat of chili (Scoville scale).

 

Der amerikanische Apotheker Wilbur Scoville entwickelt den nach ihm benannten organoleptischen Test zur Bestimmung der Schärfe von Chili (Scoville-Skala),

1937

Albert Szent-Györgyi

Photo: FORTEPAN / Semmelweis Egyetem Levéltára

 

Hungarian doctor Albert Szent-Györgyi awarded Nobel Prize in Medicine for isolation of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) from bell peppers.

 

Der ungarische Arzt Albert Szent-Györgyi erhält den Medizin-Nobelpreis für die Isolation von Ascorbinsäure (Vitamin C) aus Paprikaschoten.

Am Anfang war das Gewürz.

-Stefan Zweig, Magellan: Der Mann und seine Tat

Gewürze und Kräuter sind keine Erfindung der Menschheit. Vielmehr besiedeln sie die Erde lange vor Adam und Eva. Der Mensch lernt sie zu nutzen und Nutzen aus ihnen zu schlagen. Gewürze beeinflussen den Gang der Weltgeschichte und die Entwicklung von Seefahrt, Schiffbau und Geografie entscheidend. Eine Geschichte von Essen und Heilen, Geld und Geltung, Mord und Totschlag.

Archäologische Funde belegen die Verwendung von Gewürzen wie Kümmel und von Kräutern wie Dill für Nordafrika und Europa bereits in der Steinzeit. In der Antike werden Kräuter als Grabbeigabe und in Tinkturen für die Balsamierung Verstorbener verwendet.

Bereits im ersten Jahrtausend v. Chr. gibt es maritimen Gewürzhandel zwischen Indien, Arabien, Persien und Ostafrika auf küstennahen Seewegen im Indischen Ozean, dem Golf von Persien und dem Roten Meer. Gewürze wie Pfeffer, Kardamom und Ingwer gelangen so damals schon über den Nil und das junge Alexandria ins Römische Reich.

Die Römer bevorraten sich mit orientalischen Waren in sog. Horrea piperataria – Pfefferlägern. In den ersten Jahrhunderten n.Chr. praktizieren sie Pfefferzölle – in Form von Pfeffer oder Gewürzen zu entrichtende Abgaben – entlang der Handelsstraßen innerhalb ihres Imperiums. Später werden sie sich mit Pfefferzahlungen von Belagerungen durch die Goten freikaufen.

Schon um 50 n.Chr. beschreibt der Grieche Dioskurides die aus Indien stammende Kurkuma ausführlich in seiner Materia Medica.

Karl der Große läßt um 800 mehrere Dutzend heimische Pflanzen auf eine Liste nützlicher Kräuter setzen und ihren nachhaltigen Anbau organisieren. Die pfälzische Äbtissin Hildegard von Bingen wird anfangs des 12. Jhds. die heilenden Wirkungen von einheimischen Pflanzen wie Lavendel bei der Behandlung von Krankheiten beschreiben.

Es gilt als plausibel, dass die Erzählungen über Sindbad den Seefahrer, der wahrscheinlich im 11. oder 12. Jhd. von Basra aus Ostindien erreicht, mit dem frühen maritimen Gewürzhandel in Verbindung stehen.

Ab dem 12. Jhd. kommt es mit den Kreuzzügen, die dem christlichen Europa den Zugriff auf die nahöstlichen Handelsplätze öffnen, zu einer Art ursprünglichem Gewürzboom in Europa. Venedig und Genua monopolisieren den Gewürzhandel zwischen den mediterranen Häfen und Europa. Nördlich der Alpen werden Nürnberg und Augsburg (Fugger) zu wichtigen Handelszentren. Umschlagplätze im Nahen Osten liegen an den Endpunkten der Seidenstraße – Konstantinopel und Levante-Häfen bzw. der Karawanenwege der Händler aus dem Süden der arabischen Halbinsel – Alexandria.

Um 1393 soll in Deutschland ein Pfund Muskatnuss so viel kosten wie sieben schlachtreife Ochsen. Gewürze erhalten den Rang von Zahlungsmitteln. Warenpreise werden in Pfefferkörnern ausgewiesen und Kommunen setzen ihre Etats in physischem Pfeffer fest. Gewürze sind Gold wert und erlauben den Zwischenhändlern Aufschläge von hunderten Prozent. Nach unterschiedlichen Quellen durchlaufen Gewürze auf ihrer Reise von den Ursprüngen in Ostindien zum Verwender in Europa bis zu zwölf Handelsstufen und verteuern sich dabei um den Faktor 30. Solche Profitmargen werden heute nicht einmal im Drogenhandel erzielt.

So sind Ginger Ale und Glühwein wahrscheinlich Überbleibsel einer mittelalterlichen Schickeria-Mode, nach der alles Ess- und Trinkbare überreichlich und teuer exotisch gewürzt wird – wohl auch um der sozialen Geltung willen. Jedenfalls lässt sich nachlesen, dass zu jener Zeit der Gewürzverbrauch in Europa um ein Vielfaches höher liegt als heute.

Alfonso de Albuquerque

Alfonso de Albuquerque 1453-1515, builder of the Portuguese Empire | Begründer des Portugiesischen Weltreiches

Bis zum Beginn des 16. Jhds., als die Portugiesen auf dem Seeweg erst an die Malabarküste, dann nach Hinterindien und schließlich bis auf die Molukken gelangen, ist der Gewürzhandel mit Ostindien und Fernost weitgehend von den Arabern monopolisiert. Sie kontrollieren zum einen weite Teile des Landweges entlang der Seidenstraße, auf der sie Naturalzölle kassieren. Zum anderen fahren sie selbst zur See und bringen auf ihren Dhaus mit dem Monsun Zimt, Nelken, Muskat und Pfeffer von Indien und dem Gewürzhafen Malakka auf der malayischen Halbinsel nach Sansibar, Aden und Oman, von wo Kamelkarawanen sie durch die Wüsten Arabiens über Jiddah und Suez bis an die Küsten des Mittelmeers transportieren. Ab hier übernehmen Venezianer und Genuesen, die mit ihrem Teil des Handelsmonopols ihre Stadtstaaten zu höchster wirtschaftlicher Blüte führen.

Als 1453 Konstantinopel an die Türken fällt und das christliche Byzantinische Reich zerbricht, ändern sich die Spielregeln des Gewürztransits durch den Nahen Osten. Von jetzt an sorgt der Osmanische Sultan für stetig steigende Zölle auf orientalische Luxuswaren, einschließlich Gewürze. Das treibt die Gewürzpreise in Europa von einem Allzeithoch zum anderen und macht es für die europäischen Seemächte Spanien und Portugal lohnend, nach alternativen, unabhängigen Gewürzrouten über das Meer suchen zu lassen. Beide Herrscherhäuser einigen sich 1494 im Vertrag von Tordesillas im Grundsatz, die Welt so untereinander aufzuteilen, dass Spanien die westliche und Portugal die östliche Hemisphäre jeweils für sich erkunden.

Gewürze als globales Handelsgut haben jetzt eine weltwirtschaftliche Bedeutung wie Erdöl und Erdgas im 20. Jhd.. Kolumbus’ Expeditionen ab 1492 werden von der spanischen Krone finanziert, um den Seeweg nach Indien, sprich zu den Ursprüngen der Gewürze zu finden. Die überraschende Entdeckung Amerikas ist ein historisch bedeutender Nebeneffekt, aber nicht Ziel dieser Reisen.

Allerdings ist die Ausbeute an Gewürzen auf der spanischen Seite der Welt eher bescheiden. Kolumbus und später Cortes bringen wohl immerhin die bis dato unbekannten Chili, Vanille und Piment aus Mittelamerika nach Europa mit. Mehr aber auch nicht. Vasco da Gama und Alfonso de Albuquerque auf der portugiesischen Seite machen da mit ihren Entdeckungen in Indien, Ceylon, Java, auf den Molukken und an der südchinesischen Küste schon mehr Furore: Neben gefragtem Pfeffer, Ingwer und Cardamom vom indischen Subkontinent oder Canehl (Zimt) aus Ceylon sind es vor allem Muskatnuss und Gewürznelke von den hinterindischen Molukken, die Portugals Aufstieg zur Kolonialmacht im 16. Jhd. entscheidend befördern.

Die 1494 in Europa unbekannten Molukken sind im Vertrag von Tordesillas nicht erwähnt. Als Portugal dort erfolgreich sein Gewürzmonopol aufzieht, sieht auch Spanien für sich Potenzial. Die Alternative zur portugiesisch kontrollierten Gewürzroute um das Kap der Guten Hoffnung könnte in dem westlichen Seeweg bestehen, den Christoph Kolumbus zuvor schon suchte. Ironischerweise ist es der Portugiese Ferdinand Magellan, dem die spanische Krone eine Flotte anvertraut, die diesen Seeweg nun finden soll. Tatsächlich erreicht er 1521 die Philippinen, wo er in einem Gefecht mit Eingeborenen umkommt. Bis dahin hat er die nach ihm benannte Meerenge in Südamerika und den Pazifik entdeckt. Es ist sein Bootsmann Elcano, der auf der Victoria 1522 die Molukken und Ende des Jahres mit einer Schiffsladung Gewürze wieder spanischen Boden erreicht. Die erste Weltumsegelung ist vollzogen und damit nebenbei die Kugelform der Erde praktisch bewiesen. In den ostindischen Gewürzhandel wird Spanien allerdings nie entscheidend eingreifen.

Mitte des Jahrhunderts ist das arabische Gewürzmonopol gebrochen und durch das portugiesische ersetzt, für das Kamelkarawanen über die Seidenstraße oder die arabische Halbinsel überflüssig sind. Portugal kontrolliert jetzt Gewürzanbau und -handel von Goa und Kalikut (Indien) bis Banda Neira und Ternate (Molukken). Die neue Gewürzroute verläuft quer über den Indischen Ozean, um den afrikanischen Kontinent herum nach Norden bis nach Lissabon, Amsterdam und Hamburg. Venedig und Genua verlieren ihre privilegierte Stellung durch das Abflauen des Levante-Handels und treten in eine Phase des wirtschaftlichen Niedergangs ein. Kriege um Seeherrschaft und Kontrolle des Gewürzhandels sind jetzt innereuropäisch.

Ende des 16. Jhds. (ab 1580) gerät Portugal mangels eigenen Thronfolgers in die Personalunion mit Spanien und damit auch in Konflikt mit dessen Feinden, vor allem der aufstrebenden Seemacht Niederlande. Zu Beginn des 17. Jhds. gelangen fast alle portugiesischen Besitzungen von Brasilien über Afrika bis nach Ostindien für viele Jahrzehnte in die Hände der Niederländer. Portugiesisch-Indien geht unter und der globale Gewürzhandel an die Niederländer. Mit ihrer Vereinigten Ostindien Companie schaffen diese ein frühkapitalistisches Instrument zur systematischen Ausbeutung der Gewürzursprünge. Sie massakrieren und versklaven die Einheimischen, stellen illegalen Gewürzanbau und -handel unter Strafe und verknappen Erzeugung und Angebot durch Vernichtung ganzer Ernten und Brandrodungen wie auf Tidore und Ternate.

Bis in das 18. Jhd. hinein ist der Welthandel mit Gewürzen durch profitsichernde Monopole geprägt. Den Arabern genügt es noch, ihre Bezugsquellen zu verheimlichen bzw. die Suche nach ihnen mit absurden Schauermärchen als riskant und aussichtslos darzustellen. Portugiesen und Niederländer dagegen führen blutige Kriege um die Hoheit über Ursprünge und Vertriebswege. Anfang des 17. Jhds. mischt auch England noch mit, das auf den kleinen Molukkeninseln Rhun und Ai seine erste Kolonie errichtet. Den blutigen Belagerungen der Niederländer weicht England schließlich und tauscht Rhun 1667 im Frieden von Breda gegen New Amsterdam, das heutige New York.

Gebrochen werden diese Monopole zunächst im Verborgenen von den Franzosen, die im 18. Jhd. zwar traumhafte Tropeninseln wie Ile Bourbon und Mauritius annektieren können, dort aber kaum nutzbare Flora vorfinden. So lässt der Statthalter der französischen Überseeterritorien, Pierre Poivre, 1769 Samen und Setzlinge von Gewürznelken und Muskatnussbäumen bei Nacht und Nebel von den niederländischen Molukken schmuggeln und nach Mauritius bringen, um sie dort heimisch zu machen und systematisch anzubauen. Sein Erfolg hält sich zumindest auf Mauritius in Grenzen.

Zur Zeit der britischen Herrschaft im Indischen Ozean gelangen um 1810 Gewürznelke und Muskatnuss von der in La Réunion umbenannten Ile Bourbon nach Sansibar, wo zunächst noch der Sultan von Oman regiert und deren forcierten Anbau zur nationalen Aufgabe erklärt. Bis in die zweite Hälfte des 20. Jhds. hält Sansibar danach mit 90 Prozent des Weltaufkommens erneut ein Nelkenmonopol, das mit dem Markteintritt Indonesiens und dem folgenden dramatischen Preisverfall ab etwa 1980 aber zusammenbricht.

Die Briten bringen den Muskatnussbaum später auch in die Karibik, wo bis heute das kleine Grenada Weltmarktführer bei Muskatnuss und Macis ist. Gleichwohl spielt dieses kleine Monopol heute angesichts der globalen Diversifizierung der Ursprünge und der vergleichsweise moderaten Nachfrage nicht mehr die Rolle wie zur Zeit der Portugiesen und Niederländer.

Ein anderes, natürliches Monopol umgehen die Franzosen quasi technologisch. Es geht um die in Mexiko heimische und von Spanien kontrollierte Vanille, die in Europa jetzt gefragt, aber fast unerschwinglich ist. Sie wächst und blüht zwar inzwischen auch auf Ile Bourbon, bringt aber keine Früchte hervor. Nur die ausschließlich in Mexiko vorkommende Melipona-Biene kann Vanilleblüten bestäuben und so das Wachsen von Vanilleschoten auslösen. Das ändert sich, als es 1841 dem Sklaven Edmond Albius auf La Réunion erstmalig gelingt, Vanilleblüten unter Zuhilfenahme eines Kaktusstachels unter Freilandbedingungen künstlich zu bestäuben. Die Bourbon-Vanille ist geboren und das mexikanische Monopol gebrochen.

Heute kommt Pfeffer eher aus Vietnam oder Brasilien denn aus Indien, Muskat sehr wahrscheinlich von Grenada und Vanille aus Madagaskar. Ihre globale Erzeugung nimmt Gewürzen die einstige Mystik und Exotik ferner, unbekannter Länder und macht sie zu hochverfügbaren Alltagsprodukten. Mit dem Beginn der Industrialisierung verlieren sie das Luxuriöse. Aus dem Statussymbol wird eine Kochzutat. Manhattan ist prosperierender Hotspot der globalen Finanzindustrie, die Banda-Insel Rhun, gegen die es einst eingetauscht wurde, ein ärmliches Eiland unter Palmen. Der neue Suez-Kanal bringt ab 1869 jenseits von Laufzeiten und Frachtraten kaum noch Impulse für den Gewürzhandel, jedoch für die neuen Industrien Europas und für ein neues Statussymbol: Reisen in ferne, unbekannte Länder.

Bildquelle

Sofern nicht anders gekennzeichnet sind alle auf dieser Seite verwendeten Bilder als Public Domain (Gemeinfrei) auf Wikipedia (wikipedia.org) veröffentlicht.

Deutsch

Short history of spices and spice trade

Spices and herbs are not an invention of mankind. Rather, they grow on Earth long before Adam and Eve. Man learns to use them and take advantage of them. Spices critically influence the course of world history and the development of seafaring, shipbuilding and geography. A history of eating and healing, money and influence, murder and manslaughter.

Archaeological finds confirm the use of spices such as caraway and herbs like dill for North Africa and Europe already in the Stone Age. In ancient times, herbs are used as burial and in tinctures for embalming the dead.

As early as in the first millennium BC, there is maritime spice trade between India, Arabia, Persia and East Africa on offshore sea routes in the Indian Ocean, the Gulf of Persia and the Red Sea. Spices such as pepper, cardamom and ginger coming up the Nile to the young Alexandria thus reach the Roman Empire.

The Romans stock Oriental goods such as spices in so-called Horrea piperataria – pepper warehouses. In the first centuries AD they are practicing pepper tolls – taxes paid in the form of pepper or spices – along the trade routes within their empire. Later they will pay the Goths with pepper ransoms to free from their sieges.

Already around 50 AD the Greek Dioskurides in detail describes turmeric originating from India in his Materia Medica.

Charles the Great around 800 has dozens of native plants put on a list of useful herbs and organize their sustainable cultivation. Hildegard von Bingen, the Palatine abbess, at the beginning of the 12th century describes the healing effects of native plants such as lavender in the treatment of diseases.

It is plausible that the narratives on Sindbad the Sailor who presumingly in the 11th or 12th century reaches the East Indies from Basra are connected with the early maritime spice trade.

From the 12th century onwards, the Crusades which gave Christian Europe access to the Middle Eastern trade areas initiate a sort of original spice boom in Europe. Venice and Genoa monopolize the spice trade between the Mediterranean ports and Europe. North of the Alps, Nuremberg and Augsburg (Fuggers) become important trading centers. Transit stations in the Middle East are located at the endpoints of the Silk Route – Constantinople and Levante ports as well as of the caravan routes of the traders from the south of the Arabian Peninsula – Alexandria.

Around 1393, one pound of nutmeg in Germany reportedly costs as much as seven fat oxen. Spices soar up to the rank of a currency. Goods prices are stated in pepper grains and municipalities set their budgets in physical pepper. Spices are worth gold and allow the intermediaries to calculate mark-ups of hundreds of percents. According to different sources, on their journey from the origins in the East Indies to the user in Europe spices go through up to twelve trade levels and increase in price by 30 times. Such profit margins are not achieved today even in drug trafficking.

Ginger ale and mulled wine are probably the remnants of a medieval chic fashion, according to which all food and drink have to be exotically flavored over-the-top – probably also for the sake of social prestige. At any rate, literary sources show that at that time spice consumption in Europe is many times higher than it is today.

Maldivian Baggala (Dhow)

Xavier Romero-Frias, Painting of a Maldivian baggala. Acrylic on canvas. 2009

Until the beginning of the 16th century, when the Portuguese by sea reach the Malabar coast, then the East Indies and finally the Moluccas, the spice trade with the East Indies and the Far East was largely monopolized by the Arabs. On the one hand, they control large parts of the ground route along the Silk Road, where they collect natural tolls. On the other hand, they sail the seas with their Dhows under the monsoon and bring cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and pepper of India and the spice port of Malacca on the Malay Peninsula to Zanzibar, Aden and Oman from where camel caravans take them through the deserts of Arabia thru Jiddah and Suez to the shores of the Mediterranean. From here take over the Venetians and Genoese who with their part of the trade monopoly lead their city states to the highest economic prosperity.

When 1453 Constantinople falls to the Turks and the Christian Byzantine Empire breaks, the rules of spice-transit through the Middle East suffer changes. From now on, the Ottoman Sultan provides for steadily rising duties on Oriental luxury goods, including spices. This drives the spice prices in Europe from one all-time high to the other and makes it worthwhile for the European maritime powers of Spain and Portugal to search for alternative, independent spice routes across the sea. In 1494, in the Treaty of Tordesillas, both rulers agree in principle to divide the world in such a way that Spain explores the western hemisphere and Portugal the eastern hemisphere.

Spices as a global commodity now have a world economic importance equal to that of oil and natural gas in the 20th century. Columbus’ expeditions from 1492 onwards are financed by the Spanish crown to find the sea route to India, to the origins of spice. The surprising discovery of America is a historically significant side effect, but not the purpose of these expeditions.

However, the yield of spices on the Spanish side of the world is rather modest. Columbus and later Cortes bring at least previously unknown chili, vanilla and allspice from Central America to Europe. But not more than these. Vasco da Gama and Alfonso de Albuquerque on the Portuguese side do way better with their discoveries in India, Ceylon, Java, the Moluccas and on the South China coast: besides demanded pepper, ginger and cardamom from the Indian subcontinent or Canehl (cinnamon) from Ceylon, it is mainly nutmeg and cloves from the East-Indian Moluccas which ultimately drive Portugal’s rise to colonial power in the 16th century.

As the Moluccas are unknown in Europe in 1494 they are not mentioned in the Tordesillas Treaty. While Portugal successfully spins their spice monopoly, Spain also sees its potential. The alternative to the Portuguese-controlled spice route around the Cape of Good Hope could be in the western sea route that Christopher Columbus had been previously seeking for. Ironically, it is the Portuguese Ferdinand Magellan to whom the Spanish crown entrusts a fleet which is now to find this sea route. In fact, he reaches the Philippines in 1521 where he is killed in a battle with natives. Until then, he discovers the named after him passage in South America and the Pacific ocean. It is his petty officer Elcano, now captain of the Victoria, who in 1522 reaches the Moluccas and by the end of the year with a shipload of spices returns to Spanish ground. The first circumnavigation of the globe is completed and the spherical shape of Earth is practically proven. In the East Indian spice trade, however, Spain will never have a substantial role.

In the middle of the century, the Arabian spice monopoly is broken and replaced by the Portuguese one that has no need for camel caravans over the silk road or the Arabian peninsula. Portugal now controls spice cultivation and trade from Goa and Kalikut (India) to Banda Neira and Ternate (Moluccas). The new spice route runs across the Indian Ocean, around the African continent to the north to Lisbon, Amsterdam and Hamburg. Venice and Genoa lose their privileged position following a loss of importance of the Levant trade and enter a phase of economic decline. Wars for control of the spice trade are now between European powers.

By the end of the 16th century (after 1580), Portugal due to the absence of a successor to the throne falls into the personal union with Spain and therefore also in conflict with its enemies, especially the emerging maritime power Netherlands. At the beginning of the 17th century, almost all Portuguese possessions from Brazil over Africa to the East Indies come into the hands of the Dutch for many decades. Portuguese India breaks and the global spice trade goes to the Dutch. With their United East India Company they create an early capitalist instrument for the systematic exploitation of the spice origins. They massacre and enslave the locals, impose illegal spice cultivation and trade under punishment and scarce production and supply by destroying whole harvests and fire burns as on Tidore and Ternate.

Until the 18 th century global spices trade is characterized by monopolies. While for the Arabs it is enough to conceal their sources of reference, or to tell absurd and scary stories that present the search for them as risky and hopeless, Portuguese and Dutch, on the other hand, are carrying out bloody wars about origins and trade routes. Early 17th century also engulfs England, which erects its first colony on the small Moluccan Islands of Rhun and Ai. After all, the bloody sieges of the Netherlanders force the English to leave Rhun and in 1667 in the Peace of Breda they swap it for New Amsterdam, today’s New York.

These monopolies are first concealed in secret by the French who in the 18th century succeed to annex dreamy tropical islands such as Ile Bourbon and Mauritius though, but hardly find any useful flora on them. So, Pierre Poivre, governor of the French overseas territories, in 1769 has seeds and seedlings of cloves and nutmeg trees smuggle from the Dutch Moluccas and bring them to Mauritius for domestication and systematic farming. His success anyway is limited, at least on Mauritius.

At the time of British rule in the Indian Ocean, around 1810 cloves and nutmeg come from the Ile Bourbon, which was renamed La Reunion, to Zanzibar, where the Sultan of Oman is still governing and declaring their cultivation a national task. Until the second half of the 20th century Zanzibar is holding a new cloves monopoly with 90 percent of the world’s trade volume which collapses 1980 with the market entry of Indonesia and the subsequent dramatic price decline.

The British bring nutmeg later also to the Caribbean where to this day the small Grenada is world market leader in nutmeg and mace. However, due to global diversification of origins and comparatively moderate demand this small monopoly doesn’t have a role like in the days of the Portuguese and the Dutch.

Another natural monopoly is bypassed by the French the technological way. It is about vanilla native in Mexico and controlled by Spain which is now in demand in Europe, but almost unaffordable. Meantime it grows and flourishes also on Ile Bourbon, but does not produce any fruit. Only the Melipona bee which occurs exclusively in Mexico can pollinate vanilla flowers and thus trigger the growth of vanilla pods. This changes when, in 1841, the slave Edmond Albius succeeds for the first time in La Réunion to artificially produce a pollination of vanilla blossoms with the aid of a cactus tangle under natural conditions. Thus, the Bourbon vanilla is born and the Mexican monopoly is broken.

Today pepper mostly originates from Vietnam or Brazil, less from India, nutmeg most likely from Grenada and vanilla from Madagascar. Global production makes spices lose their erstwhile mysticism and exoticism of remote, unknown countries and makes them highly available everyday products. With the beginning of industrialization, they lose the luxurious. A marker of social status turns into a cooking ingredient. Manhattan is a prosperous hotspot of the global financial industry, the Banda Island Rhun, which it was once exchanged for, a poor island under palm trees. From 1869 onwards, the new Suez Canal has barely given impulses for spice trades beyond transit times and freight rates, but for the new industries of Europe and for a new status symbol: Travel to remote, unknown countries.

Kurze Geschichte der Gewürze und des Gewürzhandels

Gewürze und Kräuter sind keine Erfindung der Menschheit. Vielmehr besiedeln sie die Erde lange vor Adam und Eva. Der Mensch lernt sie zu nutzen und Nutzen aus ihnen zu schlagen. Gewürze beeinflussen den Gang der Weltgeschichte und die Entwicklung von Seefahrt, Schiffbau und Geografie entscheidend. Eine Geschichte von Essen und Heilen, Geld und Geltung, Mord und Totschlag.

Archäologische Funde belegen die Verwendung von Gewürzen wie Kümmel und von Kräutern wie Dill für Nordafrika und Europa bereits in der Steinzeit. In der Antike werden Kräuter als Grabbeigabe und in Tinkturen für die Balsamierung Verstorbener verwendet.

Bereits im ersten Jahrtausend v. Chr. gibt es maritimen Gewürzhandel zwischen Indien, Arabien, Persien und Ostafrika auf küstennahen Seewegen im Indischen Ozean, dem Golf von Persien und dem Roten Meer. Gewürze wie Pfeffer, Kardamom und Ingwer gelangen so damals schon über den Nil und das junge Alexandria ins Römische Reich.

Die Römer bevorraten sich mit orientalischen Waren in sog. Horrea piperataria – Pfefferlägern. In den ersten Jahrhunderten n.Chr. praktizieren sie Pfefferzölle – in Form von Pfeffer oder Gewürzen zu entrichtende Abgaben – entlang der Handelsstraßen innerhalb ihres Imperiums. Später werden sie sich mit Pfefferzahlungen von Belagerungen durch die Goten freikaufen.

Schon um 50 n.Chr. beschreibt der Grieche Dioskurides die aus Indien stammende Kurkuma ausführlich in seiner Materia Medica.

Karl der Große läßt um 800 mehrere Dutzend heimische Pflanzen auf eine Liste nützlicher Kräuter setzen und ihren nachhaltigen Anbau organisieren. Die pfälzische Äbtissin Hildegard von Bingen wird anfangs des 12. Jhds. die heilenden Wirkungen von einheimischen Pflanzen wie Lavendel bei der Behandlung von Krankheiten beschreiben.

Es gilt als plausibel, dass die Erzählungen über Sindbad den Seefahrer, der wahrscheinlich im 11. oder 12. Jhd. von Basra aus Ostindien erreicht, mit dem frühen maritimen Gewürzhandel in Verbindung stehen.

Ab dem 12. Jhd. kommt es mit den Kreuzzügen, die dem christlichen Europa den Zugriff auf die nahöstlichen Handelsplätze öffnen, zu einer Art ursprünglichem Gewürzboom in Europa. Venedig und Genua monopolisieren den Gewürzhandel zwischen den mediterranen Häfen und Europa. Nördlich der Alpen werden Nürnberg und Augsburg (Fugger) zu wichtigen Handelszentren. Umschlagplätze im Nahen Osten liegen an den Endpunkten der Seidenstraße – Konstantinopel und Levante-Häfen bzw. der Karawanenwege der Händler aus dem Süden der arabischen Halbinsel – Alexandria.

Um 1393 soll in Deutschland ein Pfund Muskatnuss so viel kosten wie sieben schlachtreife Ochsen. Gewürze erhalten den Rang von Zahlungsmitteln. Warenpreise werden in Pfefferkörnern ausgewiesen und Kommunen setzen ihre Etats in physischem Pfeffer fest. Gewürze sind Gold wert und erlauben den Zwischenhändlern Aufschläge von hunderten Prozent. Nach unterschiedlichen Quellen durchlaufen Gewürze auf ihrer Reise von den Ursprüngen in Ostindien zum Verwender in Europa bis zu zwölf Handelsstufen und verteuern sich dabei um den Faktor 30. Solche Profitmargen werden heute nicht einmal im Drogenhandel erzielt.

So sind Ginger Ale und Glühwein wahrscheinlich Überbleibsel einer mittelalterlichen Schickeria-Mode, nach der alles Ess- und Trinkbare überreichlich und teuer exotisch gewürzt wird – wohl auch um der sozialen Geltung willen. Jedenfalls lässt sich nachlesen, dass zu jener Zeit der Gewürzverbrauch in Europa um ein Vielfaches höher liegt als heute.

Alfonso de Albuquerque

Alfonso de Albuquerque 1453-1515, builder of the Portuguese Empire | Begründer des Portugiesischen Weltreiches

Bis zum Beginn des 16. Jhds., als die Portugiesen auf dem Seeweg erst an die Malabarküste, dann nach Hinterindien und schließlich bis auf die Molukken gelangen, ist der Gewürzhandel mit Ostindien und Fernost weitgehend von den Arabern monopolisiert. Sie kontrollieren zum einen weite Teile des Landweges entlang der Seidenstraße, auf der sie Naturalzölle kassieren. Zum anderen fahren sie selbst zur See und bringen auf ihren Dhaus mit dem Monsun Zimt, Nelken, Muskat und Pfeffer von Indien und dem Gewürzhafen Malakka auf der malayischen Halbinsel nach Sansibar, Aden und Oman, von wo Kamelkarawanen sie durch die Wüsten Arabiens über Jiddah und Suez bis an die Küsten des Mittelmeers transportieren. Ab hier übernehmen Venezianer und Genuesen, die mit ihrem Teil des Handelsmonopols ihre Stadtstaaten zu höchster wirtschaftlicher Blüte führen.

Als 1453 Konstantinopel an die Türken fällt und das christliche Byzantinische Reich zerbricht, ändern sich die Spielregeln des Gewürztransits durch den Nahen Osten. Von jetzt an sorgt der Osmanische Sultan für stetig steigende Zölle auf orientalische Luxuswaren, einschließlich Gewürze. Das treibt die Gewürzpreise in Europa von einem Allzeithoch zum anderen und macht es für die europäischen Seemächte Spanien und Portugal lohnend, nach alternativen, unabhängigen Gewürzrouten über das Meer suchen zu lassen. Beide Herrscherhäuser einigen sich 1494 im Vertrag von Tordesillas im Grundsatz, die Welt so untereinander aufzuteilen, dass Spanien die westliche und Portugal die östliche Hemisphäre jeweils für sich erkunden.

Gewürze als globales Handelsgut haben jetzt eine weltwirtschaftliche Bedeutung wie Erdöl und Erdgas im 20. Jhd.. Kolumbus’ Expeditionen ab 1492 werden von der spanischen Krone finanziert, um den Seeweg nach Indien, sprich zu den Ursprüngen der Gewürze zu finden. Die überraschende Entdeckung Amerikas ist ein historisch bedeutender Nebeneffekt, aber nicht Ziel dieser Reisen.

Allerdings ist die Ausbeute an Gewürzen auf der spanischen Seite der Welt eher bescheiden. Kolumbus und später Cortes bringen wohl immerhin die bis dato unbekannten Chili, Vanille und Piment aus Mittelamerika nach Europa mit. Mehr aber auch nicht. Vasco da Gama und Alfonso de Albuquerque auf der portugiesischen Seite machen da mit ihren Entdeckungen in Indien, Ceylon, Java, auf den Molukken und an der südchinesischen Küste schon mehr Furore: Neben gefragtem Pfeffer, Ingwer und Cardamom vom indischen Subkontinent oder Canehl (Zimt) aus Ceylon sind es vor allem Muskatnuss und Gewürznelke von den hinterindischen Molukken, die Portugals Aufstieg zur Kolonialmacht im 16. Jhd. entscheidend befördern.

Die 1494 in Europa unbekannten Molukken sind im Vertrag von Tordesillas nicht erwähnt. Als Portugal dort erfolgreich sein Gewürzmonopol aufzieht, sieht auch Spanien für sich Potenzial. Die Alternative zur portugiesisch kontrollierten Gewürzroute um das Kap der Guten Hoffnung könnte in dem westlichen Seeweg bestehen, den Christoph Kolumbus zuvor schon suchte. Ironischerweise ist es der Portugiese Ferdinand Magellan, dem die spanische Krone eine Flotte anvertraut, die diesen Seeweg nun finden soll. Tatsächlich erreicht er 1521 die Philippinen, wo er in einem Gefecht mit Eingeborenen umkommt. Bis dahin hat er die nach ihm benannte Meerenge in Südamerika und den Pazifik entdeckt. Es ist sein Bootsmann Elcano, der auf der Victoria 1522 die Molukken und Ende des Jahres mit einer Schiffsladung Gewürze wieder spanischen Boden erreicht. Die erste Weltumsegelung ist vollzogen und damit nebenbei die Kugelform der Erde praktisch bewiesen. In den ostindischen Gewürzhandel wird Spanien allerdings nie entscheidend eingreifen.

Mitte des Jahrhunderts ist das arabische Gewürzmonopol gebrochen und durch das portugiesische ersetzt, für das Kamelkarawanen über die Seidenstraße oder die arabische Halbinsel überflüssig sind. Portugal kontrolliert jetzt Gewürzanbau und -handel von Goa und Kalikut (Indien) bis Banda Neira und Ternate (Molukken). Die neue Gewürzroute verläuft quer über den Indischen Ozean, um den afrikanischen Kontinent herum nach Norden bis nach Lissabon, Amsterdam und Hamburg. Venedig und Genua verlieren ihre privilegierte Stellung durch das Abflauen des Levante-Handels und treten in eine Phase des wirtschaftlichen Niedergangs ein. Kriege um Seeherrschaft und Kontrolle des Gewürzhandels sind jetzt innereuropäisch.

Ende des 16. Jhds. (ab 1580) gerät Portugal mangels eigenen Thronfolgers in die Personalunion mit Spanien und damit auch in Konflikt mit dessen Feinden, vor allem der aufstrebenden Seemacht Niederlande. Zu Beginn des 17. Jhds. gelangen fast alle portugiesischen Besitzungen von Brasilien über Afrika bis nach Ostindien für viele Jahrzehnte in die Hände der Niederländer. Portugiesisch-Indien geht unter und der globale Gewürzhandel an die Niederländer. Mit ihrer Vereinigten Ostindien Companie schaffen diese ein frühkapitalistisches Instrument zur systematischen Ausbeutung der Gewürzursprünge. Sie massakrieren und versklaven die Einheimischen, stellen illegalen Gewürzanbau und -handel unter Strafe und verknappen Erzeugung und Angebot durch Vernichtung ganzer Ernten und Brandrodungen wie auf Tidore und Ternate.

Bis in das 18. Jhd. hinein ist der Welthandel mit Gewürzen durch profitsichernde Monopole geprägt. Den Arabern genügt es noch, ihre Bezugsquellen zu verheimlichen bzw. die Suche nach ihnen mit absurden Schauermärchen als riskant und aussichtslos darzustellen. Portugiesen und Niederländer dagegen führen blutige Kriege um die Hoheit über Ursprünge und Vertriebswege. Anfang des 17. Jhds. mischt auch England noch mit, das auf den kleinen Molukkeninseln Rhun und Ai seine erste Kolonie errichtet. Den blutigen Belagerungen der Niederländer weicht England schließlich und tauscht Rhun 1667 im Frieden von Breda gegen New Amsterdam, das heutige New York.

Gebrochen werden diese Monopole zunächst im Verborgenen von den Franzosen, die im 18. Jhd. zwar traumhafte Tropeninseln wie Ile Bourbon und Mauritius annektieren können, dort aber kaum nutzbare Flora vorfinden. So lässt der Statthalter der französischen Überseeterritorien, Pierre Poivre, 1769 Samen und Setzlinge von Gewürznelken und Muskatnussbäumen bei Nacht und Nebel von den niederländischen Molukken schmuggeln und nach Mauritius bringen, um sie dort heimisch zu machen und systematisch anzubauen. Sein Erfolg hält sich zumindest auf Mauritius in Grenzen.

Zur Zeit der britischen Herrschaft im Indischen Ozean gelangen um 1810 Gewürznelke und Muskatnuss von der in La Réunion umbenannten Ile Bourbon nach Sansibar, wo zunächst noch der Sultan von Oman regiert und deren forcierten Anbau zur nationalen Aufgabe erklärt. Bis in die zweite Hälfte des 20. Jhds. hält Sansibar danach mit 90 Prozent des Weltaufkommens erneut ein Nelkenmonopol, das mit dem Markteintritt Indonesiens und dem folgenden dramatischen Preisverfall ab etwa 1980 aber zusammenbricht.

Die Briten bringen den Muskatnussbaum später auch in die Karibik, wo bis heute das kleine Grenada Weltmarktführer bei Muskatnuss und Macis ist. Gleichwohl spielt dieses kleine Monopol heute angesichts der globalen Diversifizierung der Ursprünge und der vergleichsweise moderaten Nachfrage nicht mehr die Rolle wie zur Zeit der Portugiesen und Niederländer.

Ein anderes, natürliches Monopol umgehen die Franzosen quasi technologisch. Es geht um die in Mexiko heimische und von Spanien kontrollierte Vanille, die in Europa jetzt gefragt, aber fast unerschwinglich ist. Sie wächst und blüht zwar inzwischen auch auf Ile Bourbon, bringt aber keine Früchte hervor. Nur die ausschließlich in Mexiko vorkommende Melipona-Biene kann Vanilleblüten bestäuben und so das Wachsen von Vanilleschoten auslösen. Das ändert sich, als es 1841 dem Sklaven Edmond Albius auf La Réunion erstmalig gelingt, Vanilleblüten unter Zuhilfenahme eines Kaktusstachels unter Freilandbedingungen künstlich zu bestäuben. Die Bourbon-Vanille ist geboren und das mexikanische Monopol gebrochen.

Heute kommt Pfeffer eher aus Vietnam oder Brasilien denn aus Indien, Muskat sehr wahrscheinlich von Grenada und Vanille aus Madagaskar. Ihre globale Erzeugung nimmt Gewürzen die einstige Mystik und Exotik ferner, unbekannter Länder und macht sie zu hochverfügbaren Alltagsprodukten. Mit dem Beginn der Industrialisierung verlieren sie das Luxuriöse. Aus dem Statussymbol wird eine Kochzutat. Manhattan ist prosperierender Hotspot der globalen Finanzindustrie, die Banda-Insel Rhun, gegen die es einst eingetauscht wurde, ein ärmliches Eiland unter Palmen. Der neue Suez-Kanal bringt ab 1869 jenseits von Laufzeiten und Frachtraten kaum noch Impulse für den Gewürzhandel, jedoch für die neuen Industrien Europas und für ein neues Statussymbol: Reisen in ferne, unbekannte Länder.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Found this useful?

Share it with your followers!

Periodics.de may use cookies to improve your user experience. If you continue to use periodics.de, you accept the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close